Check out our Natural and Engineered Stone Slabs

!!! Hundreds of colors and patterns In Stock !!!

FOR FABRICATION AND INSTALLATION PLEASE SEE OUR SISTER SITE "FOREFRONT DESIGN"

FOR TILE AND QUARTZ OFFERINGS PLEASE SEE OUR "TILE SHOWROOM"

Quartz, Granite, Marble, Soapstone, Travertine and Quartzite come in a dazzling, kaleidoscope of color, grain, and vein patterns. There are variations for even the pickiest among us. Please explore the links below to find your unique match.

MARBLE

MARBLE

WHITE GRANITE

WHITE GRANITE

QUARTZITE

QUARTZITE

GOLD GRANITE

GOLD GRANITE

TRAVERTINE 

TRAVERTINE 

RED GRANITE

RED GRANITE

SOAP STONE

SOAP STONE

GREEN GRANITE

GREEN GRANITE

ONYX

ONYX

GRAY GRANITE

GRAY GRANITE

MULTI COLOR GRANITE

MULTI COLOR GRANITE

CREAM/TAN/BROWN GRANITE

CREAM/TAN/BROWN GRANITE

BLACK GRANITE

BLACK GRANITE

QUARTZ SLABS - IN STOCK - coming soon

QUARTZ SLABS - IN STOCK - coming soon

Once you have chosen your stone the next thing you will need to decided is what finishing edge detail will work best for you. 

Below are examples of our most popular edge details, however we are able to accommodate any edge detail you desire. 

DEFINITIONS OF DIFFERENT TYPES OF STONE 

Granite is a common type of felsic intrusive igneous rock that is granular and phaneritic in texture. Granites can be predominantly white, pink, or gray in color, depending on their mineralogy. The word "granite" comes from the Latin granum, a grain, in reference to the coarse-grained structure of such a holocrystalline rock. By definition, granite is an igneous rock with at least 20% quartz and up to 65% alkali feldspar by volume.

Quartzite (from German: Quarzit[1]) is a hard, non-foliated metamorphic rock which was originally pure quartz sandstone.[2][3] Sandstone is converted into quartzite through heating and pressure usually related to tectoniccompression within orogenic belts. Pure quartzite is usually white to grey, though quartzites often occur in various shades of pink and red due to varying amounts of iron oxide (Fe2O3). Other colors, such as yellow, green, blue and orange, are due to other mineral impurities.

Marble is a non-foliated metamorphic rock composed of recrystallized carbonate minerals, most commonly calcite or dolomite. Geologists use the term "marble" to refer to metamorphosed limestone; however, s

tonemasons use the term more broadly to encompass unmetamorphosed limestone.[1] Marble is commonly used for sculpture and as a building material.

Onyx is a banded variety of the oxide mineral chalcedonyAgate and onyx are both varieties of layered chalcedony that differ only in the form of the bands: agate has curved bands and onyx has parallel bands. The colors of its bands range from white to almost every color (save some shades, such as purple or blue). Commonly, specimens of onyx contain bands of black and/or white

Travertine is a form of limestone deposited by mineral springs, especially hot springs. Travertine often has a fibrous or concentric appearance and exists in white, tan, cream-colored, and even rusty varieties. It is formed by a process of rapid precipitation of calcium carbonate, often at the mouth of a hot spring or in a limestone cave. It can form stalactitesstalagmites, and other speleothems. It is frequently used in Italy and elsewhere as a building material.

Soapstone (also known as steatite, or soaprock) is a talc-schist., which is a type of metamorphic rock. It is largely composed of the mineral talc and is thus rich in magnesium. It is produced by dynamothermal metamorphismand metasomatism, which occurs in the areas where tectonic plates are subducted, changing rocks by heat and pressure, with influx of fluids, but without melting. It has been a medium for carving for thousands of years.

 Quartz or engineered stone is a composite material made of crushed stone bound together by an adhesive, (most commonly polymer resin, with some newer versions using cement mix). The two common stones used in producing these products are marble and quartz. The application of these products depends on the original stone used. For engineered marbles the most common application is indoor flooring and walls, while the quartz based product is used primarily for kitchen countertops. Related materials include geopolymers andcast stone. Unlike terrazzo, the material is factory made in either blocks or slabs, cut and polished by fabricators, and assembled at the worksite.Engineered stone products are gaining in popularity; many shopping malls and department stores around the world use engineered marble for floors. Research reported in Consumer Reports magazine in 2010 reveals virtually no difference in performance between quartz based products and sealed granite.[1]Breton S.P.A., a privately held company of Treviso, Italy, is the dominant supplier of equipment for making engineered stone. A mixture of approximately 93% stone aggregates and 7% polyester resin by weight (66% quartz and 34% resin by volume) is pressed into slabs (or larger blocks) using Breton's "vibrocompression vacuum process".[2] [3]Although Breton was the original manufacturer of molding equipment and still holds multiple international patents on the process, there are now several other companies producing similar machinery.Engineered stone (US name) is also commonly referred to as agglomerate or agglomerated stone, the last term being that recognized by European Standards (EN 14618), although to add to the terminological confusion, this standard also includes materials manufactured with a cementitious binder. The quartz version (which end consumers are much more likely to directly deal with) is commonly known as 'quartz surface' or just 'quartz'.